What's in this course:
- an overview of the different types of sprint workouts
- how to progress the different workouts over the course of the season
- how to set up each week of practice within the larger whole
- example of a total season program from scratch

 

Figuring out what to do when might be the biggest question for track coaches. Having been trained as a distance runner myself I was always baffled by how to structure training for my sprinters. Even after attending a USATF Level II sprints school it still took me a couple more seasons to feel like I had a solid handle on it.

If you've found this, you've probably seen other programs for sale out there. I'm sure they're great, but I've just never been willing to pay the price. What I'm offering here probably isn't any better, but I also doubt it's considerably worse. If they're selling a Ferrari, I'm selling a used Honda, but we'll both get you where you're trying to go.

I spent a lot of time compiling and distilling this information. It was really just to help get my own head around it, but I think you'll find it useful as well. I'll run you through my process of setting up a season plan and give you a brief rundown of why I do things the way I do. So instead of just copying and pasting, I'll hope you'll learn enough basic principals to be able to adjust on the fly.

CoachSimmons Rich Simmons

I am the head cross country and track and field coach at Cheney High School in Cheney, KS. It is a 3A school with 234 students. We've been fortunate enough to sign nine athletes to Division 1 schools since I became head coach in 2010. In that time, our sprinters have earned 44 state medals and set 10 new school records.

I started coaching in 2004 at Wichita East (Jim Ryun’s alma mater) before ending up at Cheney, my own alma mater. I am USATF Level 2 certified in endurance, sprints/hurdles/relays, jumps, and youth specialization.

Check out my ever in progress blog/website at www.tracknerds.com

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