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Basketball Workouts: 30 Second Shooting Drills

30 Second Shooting Workout Drill: Catch and Shoot Jump Shot

Most shots in a game are open shots. When open, the jump stop enables you to catch and shoot in one motion, thereby fostering a quicker release than the step and shoot, which is a two motion shot. It is also easier to adjust to bad passes. When using the jump stop, make certain your body is facing the basket with your hands and feet ready. Your hands are above your shoulders and your knees slightly flexed before you receive the pass. Jump behind the ball and catch the ball with your body and shooting hand facing the front of the rim. Your knees should lower just before the catch and extend upward on the catch in a quick rhythmical down-and-up motion. On bad passes, jump behind the ball, rather than reaching for the ball. Rhythm and range come from the down and up motion of your legs, rather than lowering the ball or stepping into the shot.

Catch and Shoot Jump Shot Left Elbow 

One objective of this drill is to develop your ability to catch and shoot a jump shot in one motion with a quick release. Another objective is to develop your ability to start your  jump shot in a balanced stance while facing the basket and land in balance after the shot. Start with the ball at the left box outside the lane, your back to the basket. Pass to your self by tossing the ball high so it bounces high on the left elbow. Run out on the outside of the lane with your hands high and quickly jump behind the ball, turning middle. Catch the ball with your shooting hand high and facing your target.  Shoot a  jump shot. Your knees should lower just before the catch and extend upward on the catch in a quick rhythmical down-and-up motion. Trigger words are “Catch-Up!” Hold your follow-through up until the ball reaches the net. Rebound and repeat. Your goal is  to make five jump shots in 30 seconds. This is also a great conditioning drill. At the end of the drill make two free throws. 

Catch and Shoot Jump Shot Right Elbow

One objective of this drill is to develop your ability to catch and shoot a jump shot in one motion with a quick release. Another objective is to develop your ability to start your  jump shot in a balanced stance while facing the basket and land in balance after the shot. Start with the ball at the right box outside the lane, your back to the basket. Pass to your self by tossing the ball high so it bounces high on the right elbow. Run out on the outside of the lane with your hands high and quickly jump behind the ball, turning middle. For a right handed shooter you have further to turn to catch the ball with your shooting hand high and facing your target.  Shoot a  jump shot. Your knees should lower just before the catch and extend upward on the catch in a quick rhythmical down-and-up motion. Trigger words are “Catch-Up!” Hold your follow-through up until the ball reaches the net. Rebound and repeat. Your goal is  to make five jump shots in 30 seconds. This is also a great conditioning drill. At the end of the drill make two free throws. 

Catch and Shoot Bank Jump Shot Left Side 

The main objective of this drill is to develop your ability to catch and shoot in one motion with a quick release. Another objective is to develop your ability to start a jump shot in a balanced stance while facing the basket and to land in balance after the shot. Start with the ball near the basket. Pass to yourself by tossing the ball high so it bounces high on the left side at a 45 degree angle 16 feet from the basket. Run out on the baseline side and quickly jump behind the ball, turning to the middle to face the basket. Use a jump stop and land in balance. Have your hands and feet ready with your hands above your shoulders and your knees slightly flexed. Catch the ball with your shooting hand high, facing the front of the rim. Catch and shoot in one motion. Your knees should lower just before the catch and should extend upward on the catch in a quick rhythmical down-and-up motion. Your goal is  to make five jump shots in 30 seconds. This is also a great conditioning drill. At the end of the drill make two free throws.

Catch and Shoot Bank Jump Shot Right Side 

The main objective of this drill is to develop your ability to catch and shoot in one motion with a quick release. Another objective is to develop your ability to start a jump shot in a balanced stance while facing the basket and to land in balance after the shot. Start with the ball near the basket. Pass to yourself by tossing the ball high so it bounces high on the right side at a 45 degree angle 16 feet from the basket. Run out on the baseline side and quickly jump behind the ball, turning to the middle to face the basket. Use a jump stop and land in balance. Have your hands and feet ready with your hands above your shoulders and your knees slightly flexed. Catch the ball with your shooting hand high, facing the front of the rim. Catch and shoot in one motion. Your knees should lower just before the catch and should extend upward on the catch in a quick rhythmical down-and-up motion. Your goal is  to make five jump shots in 30 seconds. This is also a great conditioning drill. At the end of the drill make two free throws. 

One Minute Shoot Out Drill

This drill helps you to develop the ability to catch and shoot in one motion with a quick release. In addition, it helps you to develop the ability to shoot under pressure. The difference between good shooters and great shooters is the ability to shoot under pressure (in this drill, the pressure is the clock). Not only is this a good shooting drill, but it is also a good pass and catch drill (passing to the shooter’s target) as well as a good rebounding drill (rebounding the ball with two hands without allowing the ball to hit the floor). Select two players to work with you. One player keeps time. The timer blows a whistle to begin the drill, whistles again after 20 seconds at the first spot, whistles after 20 seconds at the second spot, and whistles at the 1-minute mark. The other player keeps score, rebounds the ball, and passes it back to you as you shoot. You will shoot from three spots—9 feet in front of the basket, with each made shot worth 1 point; 15 feet in front of the basket (behind the free-throw line), with each made shot worth 2 points; and 21feet in front of the basket (or behind the three-point line), with each made shot worth 3 points.
     Start in a balanced stance 9 feet in front of the basket with the ball in good shooting position in front of the shooting side shoulder. On the first whistle, begin shooting and continue to shoot from the same spot until the second whistle. At the second whistle, move back until you are 15 feet in front of the basket, and continue to shoot from that spot until the third whistle. On the third whistle, move back until you are behind the three-point line in front of the basket. Continue to shoot from that spot until the final whistle. All shots count after the whistle except at the third spot, where the ball must be released before the final whistle. After shooting for 1 minute, rotate positions with the other players. The shooter becomes the rebounder and passer, the rebounder and passer becomes the timer, and the timer becomes the shooter. 

 

coachwis Hal Wissel Teaching Tomorrow's Champions

Dr. Hal Wissel has a wealth of experience in the National Basketball Association including coaching, scouting and working in the front office. Coach Wissel was assistant coach for player development for the Golden State Warriors (2006-07). Wissel was as an assistant coach with the Memphis Grizzlies (2002-05). Hal was an advance scout for the Dallas Mavericks (2001–02). Wissel served as an assistant coach for the New Jersey Nets (1996–99) and as director of player personnel for the Nets (1995–96). Hal was a scout and special assignment coach with the Milwaukee Bucks (1990–95) and assistant coach and head scout with the Atlanta Hawks (1976–77).In addition to serving in the NBA, Wissel compiled more than 300 wins as a collegiate head coach. Hal turned losing programs at Trenton State and Lafayette into conference and division champions respectively.        

Wissel led Florida Southern to four straight trips to the NCAA Division II Tournament and three straight trips to the Division II Final Four (‘80, ‘81, and ‘82), winning the NCAA Divi­sion II National Championship in 1981. In 1972, Wissel coached Fordham into the NIT Tournament. Wissel also coached the Dominican Republic National Team in 1975.In 1972, Wissel founded Basketball World a venture that conducts basketball camps and clinics and produces and distributes books and videos. Basketball World’s highly succes­sful Shoot It Better Mini Camps are conducted worldwide for players at all levels. Basketball World is now owned and operated by Hal’s son Paul. Wissel received a bachelor’s degree in physical education from Springfield College, a master’s degree from Indiana University, and a doctorate in physical education from Springfield College.Wissel is the author of two books. Basketball: Steps to Success is a best selling basketball book with over 130,000 copies sold and has been translated into eleven languages. Becoming a Basketball Player: Individual Drills has been made into a DVD. Dr. Wissel has produced five other DVDs, Basketball Shooting: Confidence, Rhythm and Mechanics; Basketball Shooting: Off the Pass, Off the Dribble and In the Post; Basketball Shooting: Make Your Shot Automatic; Basketball Shooting: Creating Your Shot Off the Dribble; and Basketball Shooting: Post Moves and Drills.Wissel’s honors include being named Coach & Athlete magazine’s Eastern Coach of the Year in 1972; Sunshine State Conference Coach of the Year (‘79, ‘80, ’81); and Division II National Coach of the Year by the National Association of Basketball Coaches in 1980. Wissel has been inducted into the New EnglandBasketball Hall of Fame, the Florida Southern College Athletic Hall of Fame, the Sunshine State Conference Hall of Fame and was named Sunshine State Conference Silver Anniversary Coach. Hal and his wife Trudy have five grown children and one granddaughter.

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